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FOREIGN CROPS AND MARKETS 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Vol. 34 January 4, 1937 No. 1 



THE NEW YEAR - 

A NEW SERVICE 



With this issue, the first of a new 
volume, Foreign Crops and Markets assumes 
an abbreviated form. It will continue to 
carry current information on conditions 
affecting foreign production and marketing 
such as has appeared under the section 
title. Crop and Market Prospects. For 
the feature articles, however, the Bureau 
is planning a monthly review, the first 
issue of which will be distributed this 
month. It will be called, "Foreign Agri- 
culture - A Review of Foreign Farm Policy 
Production, and Trade." 



2 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 34, ITo. 1 

LATE CA3LES 



India rice acreage for 1935-37 placed at 01,445,000 
acres, second estimate, compared r.dth revised estimate of 
00,735,000 acres at this time last year and final estimate 
of 01,454,000 acres for 1935-35 crop. Exportable surplus 
of cleaned rice from Burma placed at 5,053,000 pounds comoar 
with estimate of 7,254,000 pounds on corresponding date last 
year. (Director of Statistics, Calcutta, December 29, 1935. 



January 4, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



3 



GRAINS : 

O * P "■'! \i T , 

German grain dutie s red uced 

German import duties on wheat, rye, spelt, .Parley, and oats will 
be sharply reduced for the period January 1 to August 31, 1937, accord- 
ing to a cable from Agricultural Attache Loyd V. Steere at Berlin. The 
quantity of imports, however, is still subject to strict control. 

The reduction in duties appears to be a result of the shortage 
of grains and other feedstuff s in Germany the past year. At current 
rates of exchange, the existing and proposed duties are as follows, in 
cents per bushel: 



5 I mport duty 

Kind of grain \ Prior to ; January 1 to 

, I January 1, IS 5 7 j_ August 3 1, 193 7 

■ Cents ! Cent s 

Wheat ; 383„25 : 10.95 

Rye • 204.40 ■ 10.22 

Spelt . ; 383c25 , ; 10.95 

Barley \ 175.20 \ 8.76 

Oats ' 93.44 i 5.84 



Manchurian crop production estimate s 

The Manchurian 1936 soybean and corn crops exceed the 1935 produc- 
tion while those of wheat, perilla, 5 and hemps^ed are smaller, according to 
the third official estimates supplied by American Consul Lamont , at Harbin, 
through the Shanghai office of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Com- 
ments from the Shanghai office indicate that the 1936 estimates conform 
with information received from other sources but should not be fully ac- 
cepted until checked against marketings during the 1936-37 season. The 
1935 estimates are considered approximately correct with the exception of 
soy beans. Exports and information from trade sources indicate that the 
1935 soybean production was near 3,300,000 short tons instead of 4,172,000 
tons as given in the official estimate for that year. 



- Crop 


Unit 


1935 


_ __1936 


Soy beans 


Short tons 


4,172,000 


4,602,000 


Kaoliang 


Short tons 


4,394,000 


4,387,000 


Millet 


Bushels 


131,376,000 


136,685,000 


Co rn 


Bushels 


73,972,000 


82, 633,000 


TiTheat 


Bushels 


36,964,000 


32,444,000 


Hemp seed 


Short tons 


50,000 


37,000 


Perilla seed 


Short tons 


200,000 


155,000 



4 



Foreign Crops 



and Market g 



Vol. .34, No . 1 



Summary of recent feed grain info rmation 

The unusually small 1936 production of feed grains in the United 
States and Canada has reduced the total world production to considerably 
"below average, with the present world feed supply situation not greatly dif- 
ferent from that of 1934. The 1936 production of the three feed grains, corn, 
oats, and "barley, in the countries reported "before December 29, totals 132,015,00C 
short tons compared with 161,273,000 tons in 1935, 126,931,000 tons in 1934, 
and 158,618,000 tons in 1933. The countries reported to date are all in the 
Northern Hemisphere, with the exception of Argentina, which has recently re- 
leased its first estimates of the 1936-37 barlev and oat crops. 

The 1936 corn crop in the 14 countries reported is 23 percent "below the 
1935 harvest in the same countries, when they accounted for about 63 percent of 
the estimated world total. In the United States there is a decrease of nearly 
34 percent from the 1935 production. There is a 25-percent increase over the 
production of the preceding year, however, in the European countries, large 
increases in north Africa, and considerable increases in the Asiatic countries. 

The 1936 oat crop in the 30 countries so far reported, which in 1935 
raised 68 percent of the estimated world total, amounts to 2,675,859,000 bushels. 
This is a decrease of about 16 percent from the previous year. The United 
States and Canada showed heavy reductions and the European countries a production 
about the same as that of a year ago. There are considerable increases in the 
north African countries and Turkey, and a large increase in Argentina over the 
small harvest of 1935-36. 

The 1936 barl ey production in the 35 countries reported to date, which 
in 1935 accounted for 55 percent of the estimated world total, amounts to 
1,131,303,000 bushels, or 10.5 percent below the 1935 barley harvest in the 
same countries. There are large decreases in the barley crops of the United 
States, Canada, and Japan, but small increases in the European countries, the 
north African countries, and Turkey, In Argentina the 1936-37 crop shows an. 
increase of about 48 percent over the small harvest of the preceding year. 

See table on page 7 showing production of com, oats, and barley in the 
countries so far reported for 1935. 



SUGAR 

The Netherlands plans aid to Java sugar producer s 

Imports of noncolonial sugar into the Netherlands will be practically 
cut off if a Government measure recently introduced into Parliament becomes 
law, according to a report from Consul Homer Brett at' Rotterdam. Enforcement 
of the proposed measure would be particularly severe' oh Cuba and the Dominican 
Republic, which are at present the principal sources Of supply for the raw 
sugar imports of the Netherlands. ' ' 



January 4, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



5 



The objective of the proposal is to aid the sugar industry in Java, 
which has not been able to compete in the Netherlands market in recent years 
because of the availaVb i lity of sugar from other sources at prices lower 
than the cost of production in Java. Under the proposed law, buyers in the 
Netherlands would purchase Java sugar on the same price basis as competing 
sugar but the Government would subsidize producers in Java to the extent of 
the difference between the cost of Java and TTest Indian sugar delivered in the 
Netherlands. The subsidy is to be limited, however, to a total of 85,000 tons 
of Java sugar per annum. 

Pending the approval of the subsidy measure by Parliament, the 
Government by decree of November 24 restricted imports of all types of sugar 
from November 35, 1936, to May 25, 1937, to 80 percent of the average imports 
during the first 5 months of 1935. The purpose was to prevent the jeopardizing 
of the effectiveness of the proposed subsidy by an accumulation of excess 
quantities of sugar. Imports during this period can bo raa.de only upon permits 
issued by the Government. Such permits will be granted only to persons already 
engaged in the business of importing sugar. 



FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND NUTS 

Spanish orange exports greatly reduced 

According to a letter from Agricultural Attache* N. I. Nielsen in 
Paris, exports of oranges by water from Spain up to December 5 of this season 
amounted to only 430,000 half-cases (of 110 pounds) compared with 2,015,000 
half-cases exported during the same period last season. The movement of 
oranges by rail to internal markets, to ports, and to the French border is 
estimated at 17,000 short tons or only about half the movement up to 
December 5 a year earlier. Although the shipping season extends to June, the 
small exports to date and the continued internal strife point to much smaller 
exports of oranges from Spain this year compared with last year. 



LIVESTOCK, MEATS, AND TOOL \ 1 

F rance .grants export bounty on hogs and pork 

Provision for the granting of export bounties on live hogs and hog 
carcasses is mad,e by a French decree dated December 3, 1935, according to 
a report from Vice Consul E. de 17. Mayer -in Paris. The decree provides that 
the amount of the bounty will be revised periodically. Until further notice 
the bounty on live hogs will be 1.20 francs per kilogram (2.54 cents per pound) 
and on hog carcasses 1.50 francs per kilogram (3.17 cents per pound). The 
bounty will be paid only when the hogs or carcasses conform to sanitary regu- 
lations prevailing in the country of destination. 



6 



Foreign. Crops "and • Harke t e 



Vol. 34, No. 1 



Germany rations sales of fats 

Effective January 1, 1937, a system of virtual rationing of sales of 
fats was established in Germany, according to cabled advices from Ambassador 
Dodd at Berlin. As a result of the continued limited supplies, all dairy 
and "butcher shops must now register all regjlar customers, who are required 
to confine their purchases of butter and other fats to the shops in which 
they are registered. Dealers have been ordered to limit their sales to 80 
percent of their normal volume. The present system is more rigid than that 
of la.st year, when dealers' associations voluntarily placed limitations on 
sales. The new regulations are regarded by the American Agricultural Attache 
at Berlin as representing a better control of distribution rather than an 
effort to offset any material decline in supplies. It now appears that de- 
creased butter supplies may be offset by larger supplies of lard and margarine 

European wool buyers less active 

The easier tone of early December in the Australian wool markets 
resulted in somewhat lighter British buying, according to Consul E. E. Evans 
at Bradford. Continental competition also slackened somewhat but some good 
weights were bought for British accoxmt at the lower prices established for 
medium and inferior wools. Prices of best grades of wool lost little or no 
ground in the first half of December. VJbol receipts into the United Kingdom 
have increased in recent weeks and with immediate pressure for supplies re- 
lieved, importers are less inclined to pay the prevailing Australian prices, 
which are still too high with respect to those obtainable for semimanufactures 
United States buyers also were operating at the early December sales in 
Australia. 

In New Zealand, Japan continued to dominate wool values, maintaining 
at levels too high to attract British business. Despite the need of medium 
and low crossbred wool, British buyers appear disposed to await a decline in 
the Japanese activity. In South Africa also, Japan, supported by Germany, 
continued zo maintain a strong buying interest. That market, however, has 
attracted somewhat mere attention from Bradford than earlier in the season. 
In South America, also, there has been more British activity, but Japan and 
the United States are the principal buyers of South American wools. Sales 
to Russia of wools held in Bradford have been noted, especially in merino 
and crossbred 50* s. The volume of business, however, has been limited. 

Cn the European continent, the very satisfactory developments in the 
wool textile industries of France and Belgium constituted a bright spot in 
the November wool situation, according to Agricultural Attache L. V. Steere 
at Berlin. In Italy, on the other hand, the industry continued to operate 
on low levels, with only a slight tendency toward expansion of activity 
following the recent la.rger raw material allotments in connection with in- 
creased exports of woolen manufactures. The still favorable level of oc- 
cupation in German mills is tending to sag because of raw material scarcity. 
Top stocks in the possession of commission combers on the Continent are 
generally low and much below last year. In Germany and Italy this is a 
result of the drastic curtailment of imports, and in France and Belgium the 
result of greatly increased mill utilization. 



January 4, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



7 



FEED GRAIiTS: Production in specified countries, 1933-1936 



\jjL ups uy coiixx or i e s 
x ooui b u a x n x .7 o o 


; 1933 


; 1934 


— * — oh — 


; 1935 


) 1 1936 


Jrox c^--b'.4ge xmd 
; a s oi x joxj 


CORN 


: 1,000 


bu. 


: 1 , 000 


bu. 


: 1, 000. "bu. 


: 1,000 


bU. 


— > j^. — ^ — . 

: , percent 


united. States........ 


: 2,396 


525 


: 1,478 


, 027 


: 2, 296, 659 


! 1,524, 


317 


; 65.4 


Canada. 




137 




161 


: lo8 




164 


97 . 6 


Er on Ce #- . . • « * « . . . . . « 


: 17 


, 122 


: -20 


, 072 


22, 539 


1 22 j 


041 


: 97.8 


Switzerland. 




110 




113 


: 98 




94 


; 95.9 


Austria 


: 5 


377 


I 6 


104 


: 5/023 


: 5, 


319 


: 105.9 


Czechoslovakia. ...... 


: 6 


018 


: 9. 


, 727 


; 6,965 


: 12, 


361 


177 . 4 


Hungary 


: 71 


229 


: cs2 


599 


! 55,837 


: 102, 


383 


: 183.4 


Yugo slavia.. 


: 140. 


861 


: 202 


, 909 


: 1.19, 222 


: 200. 


992 


: 168.6 


Bulgaria* 


: 37 


440 


: ol 


091 


: 39,721 


34, 


837 


: 87.8 


Runania 


179 


298 


: 190 


783 


: 211,767 


: 196, 


842 


: 93. C 


Morocco 


: 5, 


528 


9 


688' 


: 5,406 


: 9, 


■425 


: 171.8 


Algeria. 




228 




282 


; 150 




236 


: 149 . 4 


Turkey. 




486 


: 19, 


255 


: 13,173 


1 a/ 19, 


917 


: 109.6 


Manchuria. 


73, 


551 


: 58 


208 


77 ,.948 


: 83, 


539 


107 . 2 


Total, 14 countries 


2,955 


850 


2, 109 


019 


2, 859., 775 


.2. 212, 


517 


: 77.4 


• OATS 


















unitea States. ....... 


733, 


156 


542, 


305 


1, 194, 902 


• . 789, 


100 


66.0 


Canado.. .............. 


326, 


695: 


341, 


190 : 


418, 995; 


. . 293, 


532- 


70.1 


England and Wales.... 


05, 


320 


78-, 


120. 


79, 660 


. • 72, 


300 


90. 9 


Sco tland 


43, 


580 


: 45, 


150: 


47:, 670: 


44, 


940 


94.3 


Norway, 


12, 


416 


12, 


145 


: 12,532 


12, 


126 


: 96. o 


Sweden, ., , 


75, 


639: 


84, 


835 


87,796; 


01, 


047 


: 92.3 


Netherlands. : 


20, 


004. 


19, 


804: 


19, 380.- 


18, 


085 


93,3 


Belgium < 


57, 


216: 


55, 


566 , 


53, 200 


35, 


749: 


67.1 


Luxemburg. , 


3, 


548 


3, 


133 


3, 075; 


2, 


933 


: 9o, 5 


France . . : 


390, 


830: 


302, 


059: 


306, 950 


293, 


523: 


9d. 6 


Spain ; 


40, 


785: 


51, 


807; 


39, 369: 


33, 


070. 


96.7 


owi Lzeriana ; 




545; 


1, 


439, 


1, 392. 


1, 


426: 


1 All / 

102. 4 


Germany 


479, 


011: 


375, 


631; 


371, 0 40: 


. 393, 


994: 


106. 2 


Austria ; 


34, 


S3 0 \ 


32, 


141 : 


26, 924: 


■ 27, 


757: 


103.1 


C z echo slovaki a : 


103, 


654: 


81, 


224; 


70. 762: 


33, 


930; 


113,6 


nungaiy , , 


24, 


537: 


17, 


869: 


16, 941: 


16, 


975; 


100. 2 


Y "11 XT' (~\ C~i 1 nir ~~. <->. 

iu.^usxavj.a. •>....»..,; 


25, 


563; 


22, 


972: 


19, 144: 


22, 


942' 


liy . o 


Greece 


9, 


257: 


6, 


707 : 


6, 903: 


o 


226: 


119, 2 


Bulgaria. , : 


8, 


948: 


5, 


133 : 


6,379 


9, 


341, 


146 . 4 


Rumania. ' 


55, 


550: 


30, 


806: 


40, 904, 


53, 


360: 


142.7 


Jr oi ana ; 


13 4-, 


ooo ; 


175, 


729 : 


170, 931; 


131, 


191: 


101.2 


iix Linuania, : 


22, 


776: 


26, 


163 : 


26, 627; 


22, 


211: 


03. 4 


Latvia. 


22, 


733: 


26, 


770; 


25, 507; 


20, 


154: 


75. 3 


Estonia. j 


3 , 


014: 


10, 


994: 


9, 262: 


3, 


214: 


88.7 


miana. , . ; 


43, 


702: 


53, 


405: 


41, 951: 


44, 


064: 


105.9 


IVlw 1 UOUU, i i i i ,,,,,,,, , 


1 


033: 


1 , 


894; 


1 , 062 : 


1, 


357. 


i<ir . o 


Algeria, : 


9, 


703: 


11, 


n <~> o . 

oou j 


7 , 2^7 : 


9, 


645: 


132.4 


Egypt : 


9, 


236: 


9, 


033: 


10, 461: 


10, 


325: 


10.3.5 


Turkey 


14, 


239: 


10, 


939: 


15, 983 : 


oj 16, 


456: 


103.0 


Argentina • 


57, 


330: 


62, 


052: 


35, 325: 


56, 


493; 


157.7 


Total, 30 countries: 


2,913, 


302: 


2, 507, 


065: 


5,178,032: 


3,675, 


059: 


84.2 



Continued - 



foreign Crops and Market: 



Vol.', 34. No. 1 



FEED GRAINS: Production in specified countries, 1933-1936, cont'd 



Crops "by countries 
reported in 1936 



BARLEY 
United States. 
C anada. ........... 

England and Wales. 

Scotland 

Ir i sh Eree State. . 
Northern Ireland.. 

Norway 

Sweden 

Netherlands 

Belgium 

Luxemburg. 

Erance 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Germany 

Austria 

Czechoslovakia. . . . 

Hungary 

Yugo slav i a 

Greece 

Bulgaria 

Rumania 

Poland 

Lithuania 

Latvia 

Estonia 

Finland 

Mai to. 

Morocco 

Algeria 

Tuni sio 

Egypt 

Turkey 

Japan 

Argentina 

Total, 35 count]: 



; 1933 


1934- . ; 


1^935 


1936 ; 


~pnv P P11 1, OP'P 1 93 

1 Ul O UU U w _L- w/ w W 

• id of 1935 


• 1 OOO tin 


- i 000 


"hn < 
UU.. ; 


l 000 

X , UUU 


"hn 


i 000 
x , uuu 




uou u 


1 53 767 


! xx 0 , 


D oU 


966 


77 1 


'I J 7 
•X- ) 


A R9 


51.6 


63 359 


• 00 , 


7 AO . 


prr 
00, 


Q7 P . 




7 9P 


06 6 


9Q 4RP 


66 


Q 07 




OXO 


oU , 


1 Q7 


96 6 


• 9 6 60 


A 




0 , 


R^7 


0 , 


UuU 


00 • 0 


6 669 


6 


77Q 


7 
f , 


9° 7 


W 7 


nnn 

UUU 




70 




IIP, 




1 4P, 


h/ 


i 60 
xou 


07.0 


4 697 




7n7 


<J , 


P A7 


<J , 


wq 


' 90-6 


9 1 65 


■ Q 
• > 


QO° 


> Q 


QR7 


r> 


QOl 
i?ux 


09 4 


9 31 1 • 








96A 


D, 


61 9 


1 05 3 


J 4 616 


4 




, 4. 


9on < 

O wU 


O 


007 
UU ( 


46 0 


• 990 

• ecu 




T OR 




l / Q 




XOO 


1 06 0 


59 5Q? 


• 47 

• ^ ' » 




47 


1 9£ 


4/1 
- x > 


A7 R 


94 4 


TOO 005 


• 1 9Q 


4R7 


Q7 




• 76 


K 96 


• 00 9 


640 




4fi r 




667 




661 
oox 


90-9 


159 907 


1 47 


1 69 


• 166 


666 


1 6Q 

J.KjUy 


940 


109.3 




_L O , 


666 


> 1 9 


41 6 


' 1 1 

p X X , 


696 


93 6 


6? 0P9 


47 


61 O 


46 


760 

f tJU 


• 46 


7Q6 


• 95 0 


30 647 


24 


Q66 

JOu 


95 


667 


96 


766 


: 104.6 


?i ?67 


1 R 


n on 
000 


• 1 7 

1 X f , 


946 


• 1 Q 


491 


112. 6 


10 539 


■ 0 

1 , 


991 

J J a. 


0 


901 


9 


969 


104.1 


16 1-^7 


■ 0 

1 *J < 


609 
owe 


1 9 

1 X(C , 


940 


1 3 


905 


: ' 107.5 


35 543 


An 




49 


460 


74 


061 
wox 


174. 5 


65 949 






67 


/AO 




991 


96.7 


10 647 


: Hi 


663 


10, 


389 


! 9, 


951. 


95.0 


0 955 


: lb! 


001 


: 9, 


390 


: 7, 


532 


00.1 

UU » J_ 


3,731 


: 5, 


276 


: 4, 


215 


— 9 


039 


95.0 


: 3,200 


9, 


503 


7, 


621 


n 

* u » 


675 


: 113.0 


6 




5« 




5 




5 


: 100.0 


I 50,406 


: 69, 


023 


35, 


009 


50, 


332 


162.9 


: 35,991 


: 44, 


753 


: 33, 


019 


31, 


967 


96.0 


: ■ 7,349 


: 6, 


090 


13, 


372 


: 3, 


445 


: 10.0 


9,236 


: 9, 


033 


10, 


461 


10, 


731 


102.6 


73,417 


l 76, 


702 


: 62, 


994 


a/ 64, 


120 


101.0 


50,631 


: 73, 


205 


73, 


707 


60, 


955 


: 07.6 


: 33,739 


35, 


559 


21, 


127' 


31, 


232 


147.0 


: 1,215,044 


. 1,156, 


079: 


1, 264, 


577 


1,131, 


303; 


09.5 



Compiled from official soirees, 
a/ Incomplete figure. 

h/ Estimate hy Agricultural Attache* C. C. Taylor, London. 



January 4, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



9 



COTTON: Price per pound of representative raw cotton at Liverpool, 
N December 24, 1936, with comparisons 



Growth 



1936 



November 





6 


13 : 


20 : 


27 


: 4 


11 


18 


. 24 




Cents 


Cent s : 


Cents: 


Cent s. 


; C en t s 


: Cents 


Cents 


: Cents 


American - 


















Middling . . . 


14.06 


13.54: 


13.77: 


13.71 


.13.91 


;14.15 


14.08 


14.35 


Low Middling. .-. 


•12.64 


.12.26: 


12.39: 


12.32 


: 12 . 48 


: 12.68 


: 12. 60 


: 12.87 


Egyptian (Fully good fair) 


















Sakellaridis. .• 


23.08 


.23.83: 


23.00: 


23. 36 


: 22.05 


: 21.91 


:21.05 


: 20.86 


Uppers : 


•15.05 


: 1-4.94: 


15.20:15.06 


■15.25 


:15.44 


:15.47 


:15.70 


Brazilian (Fair) - 


















C e ar a.. «..»»» • m ...««.««>.. 


•13.14 


:12.77: 


12.90: 


1'2. 83 


:12.99 


: 13.19 


sl3.ll 


: 13.32 


Sao Paalo ■. 


13.65 


13.27: 


13.41: 


13 . 34 


:13.50 


: 13.70 


: 1.3. 63 


:13.84 


East Indian - 
















Broach (Fully good). ...... 


11.32 


:10.96: 


11.12: 


11.08 


:li.l9 


: 11.36 


:11.19 


:11.32 


C.P.Oomra IJo.l, Superfine. 


11.64 


: 11; 28 j 


11.51: 


11.47 


:11.58 


: 11.74 


:11.58 


: 11.71 


Sind (Fully good) 


9.71 


: 9.45: 


9.68: 


9.63 


: ,9.74 


: 9.91 






Peruvian (Good) « 


















X 3XL^TXX S« ••«••» • •••••••••• • 


17.21 


:16. 83: 


17.07: 


17.02 


:17.17 


:17.38 







December 



Converted at current exchange rate 



BU'x'TER: Price per pound in New York, San Francisco, Copenhagen, and 
London, December 30, 1936, with comoarisons 



Market and description 


1936 


December 23 


December 30 


' January 2 


Copenhagen, official cjuotatioi 
London: • ; 


Cents 

34.8 
33.5 
i • 17.9 

24.1 
20.6 

sJ 

20.0 


Cents 

! 34.5 .. . 
: -33.5 . . - 
17.9 , 

: .23.9 

: 20.8 ... 

20.5 
\ , 20 • 2 


Cents 

: 36.0 
: . -35.5 
: 22.6 

> ■ ■ ■ ■ 28.-2 
-21.8 
^ • • - 21.9 
:•• • - a/' 



Foreign prices converted at current rates of exchange, 
a/ Quotation not available. 



10 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 34, Ho. 1 



KJTTER: New Zealand grading, 1936-37 season to December 1, 
with comparisons 



Date 


1934-35 


1935-.56 


1936— 37 




1,000 pounds ! 

:. — — 


1,000 pounds ! 


1,000 pounds 


Week ended 






August 1 to September 25./...., 


35, 863 


35, 259 


35, 353 


October "2. 


7,700 : 


6, 496 


7,560 


9. 


• 8,333 : 


7,633 


8,120 


16 


! 8, -848 


8, 233 


8,960 


23 


; ■ 9, 156 . 


9,206 


: 9,520 


30 


• 9,968 


9', 575 


9,744 


October total 


44, 005 


41,143 


43, 904 


November 6 


• ' 10,192 


10,248' 


10, 360 


13 


10,416 


10,136 


: ' 11,200 


20 . .V 


; 10, 416 : 


10,472 : 10,920 


27.. . .... 


10, 808 


10, 360' 


: 10,376 


November' total 


41, 632 


41, 213 


43 , 456 


December 4. 


10, 192 


10, 696 


10, 696 


: 11 


: 9, 968 


10,636 


11,032 


Total August 1 to December. 11. 


141,860 


139', 020 


144, 441 


Agricultural Attache* C. C. Taylor, London. 



BUTTER: Austr 



xlian grading, 1936-37 season to December 5, 
with comparisons 



, Date 


: 1934-35 


1935-36 


; 1936-37 




1,000 pounds 


1,000 pound:: 


1, 000 noun (is 


Week ended 








July 1 to September 26 


; 30,868 


24, 17 S 


: 20,067 


October 3 


5,784 


4, 771 


3,721 


10 


: 6,500 


• 5,383 


4, 059 


17 


6, 515 


6,704 


: 4, 731 


24 


7,302 


: 7,155 


; 4,525 


31 


8, 617 


7,728 


; 4,968 


October total 


34,719 


31,741 


•?■? <~)04. 


November "'7, 


8,590 : 




4, 997 


14 


8, 803 .: 


■ -8, 631 ; 


5, 096 


21 


7,526 ; 


8,384 ■ , 


5, 696 


28 


10,022 


8,086 


5,042 


November total 


34, 941 : 


33, 313 


20, 831 


December 5 


8,570 


7 , 249 


5,233 


Total July 1 to December 5....' 


109,098 ; 


' 96,482 j 


68,155 



Weekly Dairy produce Note 



Imperial Economic Committee, 



January 4, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



11 



EXCHANGE BATES: Average weekly and monthly values in Hew York of 
specified currencies, December 26, 1936, with comparisons a/ 











Month 






Week end 


3d 


Country 


; Monetary 
Unit 


i JOI 




1936 


1936 












. U'ciC . 


L/c C . 


TV ^ 
lye C . 






Nov. 


Nov. 


Oe P b . 


n c t 


J>] O V . 


1 P 




<ee 






Cents 


Cents 


P it* r> "h o 


e-c.Il 0 b 




uc Li b b 


Cents 




Argentina . . 


Paper peso. 


33.26 


32.82 


oo « oi 


^P 67 


r ^P Rft 

OC. (JO 


^P 69 


%"? T~\ 
oo » f o 


^P 74- 

U(J i it 


Canada 


Dollar 


102.47 


98.92 


i on n? 


1 Of) 0 P 


i r>n i ? 

1UU • J- iC 




i on t i ) 


•TOO OP 


China 


Shang . yuan . 


33. 39 


29. 65 


29.94 


29.33 


29.47 


29. 62 


29.39 


29.42 


Denmark. . . . 


Krone 


22.27 


21.98 


22.48 


21.87 


21.82 


21.88 


21.92 


21.92 


England. . . . 


Pound. 


498.90 


492.50 


503. 63 


489.84 


488.80 


490.03 


491.02 


491.16 


France. .... 


Franc 


6.59 


6.59 


6.51 


4.67 


4.65 


4. 66 


4. 67 


4.67 


Ge rmany .... 


ReichsmarK. 


40.21 


40.23 


40.08 


40.20 


40.22 


40.23 


40.23 


40.23 


Italy. ..... 


Lira 


8.54 


8.10 


7.85 


5.53 


5.26 


5.26 


5.26 


5.26 


J a/pan 


Yen 


29.06 


28.68 


29.41 


28. 61 


28.56 


28.52 


28.55 


28.58 


Mexico ..... 


peso. 


27. 76 


27.77 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


27. 75 


Netherlands 


Guilder. . . . 


67. 60 


67.80 


66. 74 


53.63 


53.99 


54.42 


54.57 


54.75 


Norway 


Krone 


25.07 


24.74 


25 . 30 


24.61 


24.56 


24.63 


24.67 


24.67 


Sweden 


Krone 


25. 72 


25.39 


25.96 


25.52 


25.20 


25.27 


25.31 


25.32 


Switzerland 


Franc 


32.47 


32.44 


31.42 


22.99 


22.98 


22.98 


22.99 


22.99 



Federal- Reserve Board, a/ Noon haying rates for cable transfers. 



LIVESTOCK AftD MEAT: Price per 100 pounds in specified European markets 

December 23, 1936, with comparisons a/ 







Week ended 




Market and item 


December 25, 


December 16, 


December 23, 




1935 


1936 


1936 




Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Ge rmany: 








Price of hogs, Berlin 


17.70 


17.70 


17.70 


Price of lard, tcs. , Hamburg 


13.61 


14.87 


14. 83 


United Kingdom; b/ 








Prices at Liverpool first quality- 








American green bellies 


Norn inal 


18.19 


18.20 




18.21 


20.16 


20.17 


Canadian green sides 


15.45 


17.86 


17.87 


American short cut green hams.... 


20.13 


20.49 


20.50 


American refined la„rd 


14.41 


15.47 


15.31 



Liverpool quotations are on the basis of sale from importer to wholesaler, 
a/ Converted at current rate of exchange, b/ Week ended Friday. 



12 



Vol. 34, No, 1 



index 



: Page 
Late cobles ■ 2 



Bex ley: 

Inport duty, Germany, 

Jan. 1-Aug. 31, 1937 3 

Production, specified countries, 

1933-1936. .* 4, 8 

Butter: - 
G-radings: 

Australia, Dec, 5,, 1936 10 

New Zealand, Dec. 11, 1935 10 

Prices, specified markets, 

Dec. 30, 1935 9 

Corn: 

production: 

Manchuria, 1935,1935 3 

Specified countries, 1933-1936.4,7 
Cotton, prices, U« K. , 

Dec. 24, 1936 9 

Exchange rates, foreign, 

Dec. 25, 1936 11 

Pats, sales rationing, 

Germany, Jan. 1, 1937 6 

Henpseed, production, 

Manchuria, 1935,1935 3 

Kaoliang, production, 

Manchuria, 1935,1936 3 

Livestock (hogs), export 'bounty, 

France, Dec. 3, 1935... 5 

Meat (pork): 

Export bounty, Prance, 

Dec. 3, 1936 5 



Page 

Meat (pork), cont'd: 

Prices, foreign markets, 

Dec. 24, 1936 11 

Millet, production, 

Manchuria, 1935,1935 3 

Oats: 

■Inport duty, Germany, 

Jan. 1-Aug. 31, 1937 3 

Production, soocified countries, 

■ 1933-1936.."..... ' 4,7 

Oranges, exports, Spain, 

Dec. 5, 1936........ 5 

Perilla seed, production, 

Manchuria, 1935,1935 3 

Rice: 

Area, India, ■ 1935, 1935 ....... 2 

Exportable surplus, Burma 

( India), 1936-37 2 

Rye, import duty, Germany, 

Jan. 1-Aug. 31, 1937 3 

Soy beans, production, 

Manchuria, 1935,1936 3 

Spelt, import duty, Germany, 

Jon. 1-Aug. 31, 1937 3 

Sugar (Java), import subsidy 

proposal, Netherlands, 1937 4 

Wheat: 

Import duty, Germany, 

Jan. 1-Aug. 31, 1937 3 

Production, Manchuria, 1935,1936. 3 
Wool, market conditions, specified 

countries, December, 1936 6